Whole Food Homestead

plant. grow. reap. eat.

Month: October 2015

Two Sourdough Pancake Recipes with Gluten-Free Option!

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I’m finally delivering on some promised sourdough (and gluten free, if you wish) recipes – starting with light and fluffy pancakes! I love using sourdough recipes because I know that I’m feeding my family a healthful, nourishing meal, rather than “just pancakes.” Continue reading

Sourdough Pancakes

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This recipe requires a sourdough starter, which is basically a bubbling mixture of flour and water that sits on your counter waiting to be transformed into nutritious meals and snacks at any time! If you don’t yet have one, learn how – it’s a slight learning curve but seriously easy to do.  You can even do gluten-free sourdough baking, which is a miracle worker!

Sourdough Pancakes
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Sourdough Pancakes
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat your griddle over low-medium heat. A skillet completely brought up to temperature is a secret to successful pancakes. On my stove this is at the "2."
  2. Mix the egg, sweetener, melted oil and baking soda well and then add the sourdough starter, stirring until just combined. If you are working with the gluten-free starter, however, stir, mix or beat to your heart's desire - there is no gluten present, so no risk of developing it into chewy pancakes.
  3. Melt a bit of coconut oil or butter on your skillet and scoop the batter in about 1/4 cup increments. Watch for bubbles and a golden-brown underside to know when to flip. If your pancakes are browning too much before you see the bubbles, turn down the heat. Flip and cook for a couple minutes more. Enjoy!
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Egg-Free, Gluten-Free Sourdough Pancakes

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Between my two daughters, we are on the out with both eggs and gluten – oh, and dairy too. Blah. So as you can imagine I was so happy to find this recipe at culturesforhealth.com. But what’s great is that these pancakes are delicious whether you have the dietary restriction or not. And if you’d like to add an egg in, go ahead, it won’t hurt! As you can see above, these pancakes are thick and fluffy – a truly inspiring thing to come by with no gluten or egg. I want to be respectful of the original recipe, so rather than copy it here, I am going to send you there! Enjoy!

Start Your New Garden in 10 MINUTES

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Starting a new garden is one of those projects that gets put off either because we think it will be a ton of work, or we just don’t know where to start. If that’s you, I have great news – just ten minutes of effort this fall will win you a fertile, weed and grass free garden plot that is ready to go in the spring! No ripping up sod, no spraying Roundup to kill grass, no tilling, no hauling in loads of compost and mulch – I’m not joking, it’s really hardly any work at all. And if you usually bag up your fall leaves, this method will actually save you time. I’m not going to make this sound more fancy than it really is – the process is simple:

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Gluten Free Sourdough: The Secret to Gluten-Free Baking

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Whether a gluten-free lifestyle came to you uninvited or by choice, you’ve likely discovered that gluten-free baking can be quite challenging. Recipes often call for numerous ingredients to improve texture such as xanthan gum, guar gum, psyllium husk and others that are hard to pronounce, hard to find, and for many people cause digestive issues,  which is probably why you went gluten free in the first place! Furthermore, typical recipes call for multiple flours and encourage you to measure by weight with a kitchen scale so things actually turn out. In the end you still may end up with a brick or crumbly mess. Sigh. All this tedium and exactitude is not my style. So, this summer when we figured out that our three-year-old was having issues due to gluten, I knew I needed to figure out a process that would still allow us to enjoy family favorites, but without too much hassle or blowing our grocery budget on store-bought GF items (not to mention, so many of the store-bought products are hard to find organic, and they typically have a ton of “extra” ingredients I don’t care for health-wise).

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Basic Korean Kimchi

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Now – RIGHT NOW, as in don’t waste another weekend! – is a beautiful time of year to visit your farmer’s market – the colors and smells are amazing! Piles of purple cauliflower, peppers in every color, bright pink, orange and yellow chard, squashes, pumpkins, root vegetables, and even a few precious hold-outs from the summer such as cucumbers, beans and tomatoes, if you’re lucky. This is the glorious last-hurrah of the growing season, and I am focused on collecting and storing as many of these nutritious foods as I can for the upcoming winter. This kimchi recipe is perfect for doing just that – you can find nearly every ingredient in your own garden or the farmer’s market right now (the exception may be the ginger root).

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Fermented Carrot Sticks

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These are a super easy fermented vegetable to prepare. Carrots are easy to find and inexpensive – and this time of year you should even be able to find them at a farmer’s market. The flavor is similar to dill pickles and the texture will remain pretty crisp, so if you are new to fermenting vegetables, these carrot sticks shouldn’t come across as overly exotic.

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Sourdough Baking: Why and How

I have a bubbling jar of sourdough starter going at all times and use it for absolutely everything – bread, muffins, doughnuts, pizza dough, pancakes, biscuits, you name it. If it contains flour, I make it with sourdough. Why would I do this? What am I even talking about? I’m so glad you asked! A sourdough “starter” is just a mixture of flour and water populated with lactic-acid-producing bacteria – these are the “good” bacteria, or “probiotics” you’ve probably heard about. This is the same genre of bacteria that is used to culture milk into yogurt. There are so many benefits, but to me the biggest are that the bacteria work in the flour to break down gluten and phytates (or phytic acid) – making the end product easier to digest and the nutrients in the flour more bioavailable. There is a bit to dig into here, so if you’re up for it, read on. Otherwise, you can skip down to the instructions for getting started!

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Dried Apple Rings

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It’s apple-picking season in Minnesota, and we have had so much fun gathering apples from every corner – neighbors, friends, a tree I never noticed right by the nearby high school, and two newly-discovered wild apple trees in the marsh behind our house. Of course apple orchards are another fun way to get your apple fix, but don’t underestimate your ability to find a crop of free, and probably pesticide-free, apples near you!

Drying apples is one of my new favorite ways to preserve apples – for one thing, it is less labor-intensive than making applesauce. Also, it is a super easy, and non-messy, snack for the kids on-the-go.

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