Whole Food Homestead

plant. grow. reap. eat.

Tag: seasonal-spring

Warm Millet with Rhubarb Compote

Rhubarb is in season! Everyone ought to have rhubarb in their yard somewhere – not only does it come back every year, demand very little care, and escape most if not all pests and diseases, but it’s the first crop of the season that lends itself to sweet and fruity dishes. We don’t have to wait for berry season to enjoy jams, spreads, pies, crisps and compotes thanks to this early producer. Continue reading

SPRING Rolls

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It’s spring! The first edibles are popping up all around us – asparagus, mint, chives, sprouts and greens of all kinds to name a few. Last week it dawned on me for the first time that the name “spring rolls” might have something to do with the first offerings of spring. Sure enough, a cursory search revealed that spring rolls most likely originated as a seasonal food in China, where spring vegetables were wrapped in a pancake and enjoyed as a welcome change from winter preserves. Continue reading

Plant Now: Your Early Spring Garden

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My favorite seven words this time of year are: “As soon as soil can be worked.” It’s a simple phrase in the planting instructions for a handful of plants that love the cold, and you can literally sow them directly into the ground as soon as the soil can be worked. That’s now!!! It may only be April, but if you’re interested in getting some early produce from your garden, now is the time to get started! Continue reading

Dandelion Season is Coming! Here’s the Easiest Fix Ever…

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As the weather starts to warm, we know that the return of spring also means the return of lawn-care season, with the opening act typically being an onslaught of dandelions in your yard. Continue reading

Winter-Meets-Spring Quinoa Salad

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When we talk about seasonal produce, we are generally referring to those that grow locally during a specific time of year. There is of course a caveat with winter – when the ground is frozen solid, “seasonal” still includes those fall crops that store beautifully throughout the cold months – mainly, winter squashes and root vegetables (thus the many hearty stews and comfort foods that winter is known for). As we near the close of winter, however, our palates start to bore of those roasted and crock-pot-treated root vegetables, and we crave sweetness, lightness and crunch. That’s where this salad comes in. Continue reading